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  • La cultura messa a nudo dalla crisi Covid-19. Fragilità, potenzialità e riforme strutturali
    Culture laid bare by the Covid-19 crisis. Fragility, potential and structural reforms «Il capitale culturale»
    Studies on the value of Cultural Heritage
    focus on Interculturality

Culture laid bare by the Covid-19 crisis. Fragility, potential and structural reforms «Il capitale culturale» Studies on the value of Cultural Heritage

 

The crisis in the cultural sector generated by the Covid-19 pandemic gives evidence to some strong limitations that have affected the sector for years: fragmentation among the main cultural players; focus mostly on the major cultural and touristic attractors (not on their surroundings) as far as investments are concerned and, consequently, large numbers of tourists as first aim and international digital biggest players to depend upon; delay in the carrying out of innovative projects where technology dominates regardless of social purposes. All these elements clearly show sector’s weakness and its predictable unsustainability in the future. We face a crucial choice: if we are able to assume a new systemic paradigm in line with the European one, we will be able to provide the cultural sector with new generative impulses, otherwise there will be no conditions for an economic, social and cultural new start. For the sector by itself, but also for territories and communities. In order to address rightly, first of all we have to abandon the sectoral (and bordering) vision of the cultural enterprise. It will be also necessary to implement structural reforms that provide enabling settings and limit bureaucracy; activate smart partnerships able to engage public and private actors on the implementation of territorial integrated strategies, sharing responsibilities and tasks; invest on either technological innovation or human capital, training the new generations on all those hybrid skills required, so that, after the emergency, cultural work can finally gain in respect and dignity. If we succeed, we will have put the bases for a keyrevolution that will definitely allow future generations to live by working in the cultural sector.

download pp 447-461